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Monthly Archives: January 2010

Jessica Craig Martin

A book co-published by Images en Manoeuvres and RVB

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Jüergen Bergbauer

untitled (parterre de pieces coupees I)
100 cm x 125 cm (40” x 50”) lambdaprint on aluminium / diasec face matt, 2004

untitled (parterre de pieces coupees II)
100 cm x 125 cm (40” x 50”) lambdaprint on aluminium / diasec face matt, 2004

untitled (escalier monumental I)
100 cm x 140 cm (40” x 55”) lambdaprint on aluminium / diasec face matt, 2004

untitled (orangerie I)
100 cm x 110 cm (40” x 43”) lambdaprint on aluminium / diasec face matt, 2004

Jardin a la francaise

The formal vocabulary of the Baroque as a stand-in for an idea of history and its connected values. If Andre LeNotre, the architect of the gardens of Vaux le Vicomte and Versailles would present a design for a garden today, he would most certainly do this with form.z or any other 3-D graphic software. Detailed studies of the various elements might look like these pictures. Turned in a perspective, that simulates the point of view of a 3.50 meters tall spectator, isolated, and placed on a beige field of colour, suggesting the sandy ground. Illumination settings on ”diffused”and ”omni’.

Chris Jordan

Midway
Message from the Gyre

These photographs of albatross chicks were made on Midway Atoll, a tiny stretch of sand and coral near the middle of the North Pacific. The nesting babies are fed bellies-full of plastic by their parents, who soar out over the vast polluted ocean collecting what looks to them like food to bring back to their young. On this diet of human trash, every year tens of thousands of albatross chicks die on Midway from starvation, toxicity, and choking.

To document this phenomenon as faithfully as possible, none of the plastic in any of these photographs was moved, placed, manipulated, arranged, or altered in any way. These images depict the untouched stomach contents of baby birds in one of the world’s most remote marine sanctuaries, more than 2000 miles from the nearest continent.

Chris Jordan, Seattle, October 2009

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